From the monthly archives:

June 2010

Roasted Habanero Salsa: Eating the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

by Karen June 23, 2010
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The habanero is a small orange fiery chili that originated from the Yucatan Peninsula. To give you a sense of how spicy the habanero is, it’s rated about 100,000-350,000 Scoville heat units while the jalapeño has about 2,500-8,000 heat units. Needless to say, use this salsa sparingly! buy argumentative essays – 12 habanero chilies – […]

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Pickled Red Onions: Eating the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

by Karen June 23, 2010
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– 2 red onions, thinly sliced – 1 cup of freshly squeezed sour oranges OR 3/4 cup of lime juice and 1/4 cup of orange juice – 1 tbsp of kosher salt Pour boiling water over the sliced onions and let it sit for about 10 seconds. Drain the water and toss in the sour […]

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Cochinita Pibil: Eating the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

by Karen June 23, 2010
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The unique ingredient in cochinita pibil is annatto seed. It grows on the achiote tree and is a native spice to Mexico. It has a mild peppery flavor and is used as a red dye in things like cheddar cheese and margarine, similar to how turmeric is used to dye foods yellow. The Mayan used […]

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Cochinita Pibil: Visiting the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

by Karen June 20, 2010
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I just love Mexican food— I mean, who doesn’t?! In Los Angeles, we’re spoiled silly with some of the most amazing Mexican food in the States and access to a wide range of Mexican produce. However, what tends to make it up north into the sprawling mega malls so frequented by the majority of Americans […]

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Zongzi: Eating China

by Karen June 19, 2010
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I’m typically not a fan of foods that take a whole day of attention and preparation. Foods like zongzi are an exception to that because although there’s a ton of prep work involved, it brings together people in the making of it— the whole process turns into an assembly line. 8 hands are better than […]

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Zongzi: Visiting China

by Karen June 14, 2010
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This week millions of people in China and Taiwan are celebrating Duanwu Jie (the Dragon Boat Festival). This festival is celebrated by eating zongzi, a small package of stuffed sticky rice wrapped in bamboo leaves. Also known as the “Chinese tamale,” zongzi can be stuffed with a variety of fillings ranging from savory pork belly […]

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Fattoush: Eating Lebanon

by Karen June 12, 2010
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A light and tangy salad is the perfect side for a hearty dish like mujaddara.   Fattoush is a salad made of mixed vegetables topped with fried pita, and is made when cooks have left over stale pita. However, instead of standing over a greasy hot fryer, I’m just going to buy store-bought pita chips, […]

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Mujaddara: Eating Lebanon

by Karen June 12, 2010
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There are so many variations on this ancient dish, depending on where in the Middle East you are or which home or restaurant you eat it in. I prefer a break from tradition here and opt for a drier rice dish where the lentils retain their shape. Mujaddara is also not typically eaten with yogurt, […]

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Mujaddara: Visiting Lebanon

by Karen June 6, 2010
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This week I’ve decided to revisit something that I’ve done many times before- mujaddara. Lebanese cuisine spans an incredible range of tastes resulting in lovely combinations of bright and earthy dishes. Its repertoire is so much deeper than the oily shawarma and pita that we’re typically exposed to. Mujaddara is comfort food in Lebanese cooking […]

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